Into The Personal Website Verse Wide 01

Into the Personal-Website-Verse

Social media in 2019 is a garbage fire.

What started out as the most promising development in the history of the Web – the participation of users in the creation of content and online dialogue at scale – has turned into a swamp of sensation, lies, hate speech, harassment, and noise.

Your Unfriendly Neighborhood

Craving for attention and engagement, our timelines have changed. Algorithms now prioritize content from people with a huge following and everything that is loud and outrageous. It’s all about what the masses and the bots “want”, what they will like, share, and click. This strategy might be driving sales of ads because traditional online marketers are obsessed with quantity and it is – besides selling user data – the only answer they found for venture capital constantly demanding a bang for the buck. Yet it leads to an experience that is so often just more of the same and at the same time much less predictable, less organic, and less adjustable to your own preferences. As Craig Mod writes, “social networks seem more and more to say: You don’t know what you want, but we do.”

Consequently, it has become substantially harder for people with a small to medium following to get their voices heard and find a practical and creative use for services like Twitter or Medium. Twitter, for example, used to be that place where you would meet nice and brilliant people from the web community and make new friends, where you could find and share ideas and inspiration. But Twitter has changed so drastically and I’ve seen so many people turning quiet or leaving completely, that I don’t know how long this journey will continue. As with so many technologies before, the initial hopeful enthusiasm that accompanied the rise of social media has given way to disillusionment.

One day, Twitter and other publishing platforms like Facebook, Instagram, or Medium will indeed die, like so many sites before them. And every time this happens, we lose most of the content we created and with it a fair amount of our collective cultural history.

Data loss isn’t our only problem, though. If you decide to publish your work on a platform like Medium, you’re giving away control over it. What if Medium suddenly decided to extend the already existing paywall to all articles? There’s not much you could do about it. Simply because you don’t own your content anymore.

Maybe this wouldn’t be a big issue if owning your content today wasn’t more important than ever. Especially, but not only, if you are working as an independent or freelancer, your content is not just something you happen to have created – and for which you own the copyright of, by the way – but it is also part of your identity. It is part of who you are, what you’re thinking about, what you believe in, and what you’re up to. It is part of the story you are about to tell. It is part of the change you seek to make. Your content is one of your most valuable assets and thus owning it is invaluable.

So it comes as no surprise that more and more people are looking for alternatives. Not only for alternatives to Twitter or Medium per se but to the way social media currently works in general. Many are craving for more control, less noise, and for having more real and meaningful conversations again.

Homecoming

There is one alternative to social media sites and publishing platforms that has been around since the early, innocent days of the web. It is an alternative that provides immense freedom and control: The personal website. It’s a place to write, create, and share whatever you like, without the need to ask for anyone’s permission. It is also the perfect place to explore and try new things, because, as Seth Godin likes to say, we now live in a world of “unlimited bowling”. It is totally up to you what you create and because you have unlimited shots on the Web, you can try out different formats, different styles, different topics. Regardless of what other people might think and although it might not work. Creation is free.

A personal website is also a powerful playground to tinker with new technologies and discover your powers. Take Rachel Andrew’s and Sara Soueidan’s word for it:

I couldn’t agree more. Building things for your own site is so worthwhile because you are allowed to make mistakes and learn without pressure. If it doesn’t work today, well, maybe it’ll work tomorrow. It doesn’t matter. And so it was on my own site that I, too, wrote my first service worker, that I first tried out CSS Grid, that I designed and implemented a custom syntax highlighting theme, that I set up an RSS/Atom and JSON feed, that I wrote three plugins for Craft CMS in PHP/Yii, and Twig, with one of those plugins adding Webmention support to my site. I also learned a ton about accessibility, performance optimization, or web font loading. All of which I then could put to use in my day-to-day work as a designer and developer.

But maybe the most compelling reason why a personal website and also learning how to build one is incredibly valuable is this: community. Since the days of “guest books”, personal websites have been a place to receive feedback and discuss ideas and concepts with others. Often by the means of comments, sometimes even by writing a series of follow-up articles back and forth.

Now imagine, for a moment, an environment where a decentralized fabric of connected personal sites allows everyone to publish their own content but also enables each individual to engage in an open discussion – answering, challenging, and acknowledging the ideas of others through this universe of personal sites.

As idealistic as this vision of the Web might seem these days, it isn’t that far out of reach. Much of what’s needed, especially the publishing part, is already there. It’s also not as if our sites weren’t already connected in one way or another. Yet much of the discussions and establishment of connections, of that social glue that holds our community together – besides community events in real life, of course –, mostly happens on social media platforms at the moment. But: this is a choice. If we would make the conscious decision to find better ways to connect our personal sites and to enable more social interaction again, and if we would then persistently work on this idea, then we could, bit by bit, influence the development of Web technologies into this direction. What we would end up with is not only a bunch of personal websites but a whole interconnected personal-website-verse.

Weaving Our Web

It’s, of course, safe to assume that a web of personal websites will never be an equivalent substitute for a social network like Twitter. But that’s also not the goal. Personal websites are called personal websites because they are just that: personal. Thus, the primary objective still is to have a place to express ourselves, to explore ourselves, a place that lasts while the daily storms pass by. A place of consideration, and yes, a place of proudly sharing what we do, what we think, and what we care about. A place to contribute your voice and help others. A home on the internet. A place to tell your story.

But on top of that, we have the chance to (re-)establish personal websites also as central elements of online discourse and as entry points for people who are new to the web community. For this, we need to find ways to create an ecosystem that lives up to the diversity of the personal-website-verse. Consequently, what will hold our sites together, is most possibly not one technology to rule them all, but a multitude of different and ever-evolving technologies. Things like hyperlinks, comments, Webmentions, and RSS, of course, but also other technologies that have yet to be invented. Not only would this leave enough room for individual preferences, but it would also make the whole construct more resilient while still being flexible enough to evolve over time.

The first step of this is to explore more ways to establish new and strengthen existing connections – and also to improve findability. We don’t have to reinvent everything from scratch but can build on so much that already exists. Some things that can serve as good starting points are:

Quote people and link to other sites.

Whenever you stumble upon an interesting thought on another site, write about it and link to it. Not only is it respectful to link to the person you quoted, but hyperlinks are also the magic force holding the Web together. They are both helpful and powerful. You can also add a links section to your site, where you collect interesting links you found on the web and over time build an archive for yourself and others.

By the way: What happened to the blogroll? Remember? That little box in the sidebar of blogs that would link to the websites of friends and fellow bloggers. The blogroll isn’t dead yet – some people still use it. So how about adding a little section or page to your site that does exactly the same? Link to the personal websites of people you respect and appreciate, maybe with a little description? While we’re on it, we could also bring webrings back. Charlie Owen recently also wrote about them and Max Böck was so inspired he built a starter kit for hosting your own webring.

Use RSS feeds and readers.

RSS has been pronounced dead over and over again, yet it is still not dead and I doubt that it ever will be. In fact, it is witnessing a little comeback from time to time. Personally, I have started to use it more regularly again and others have, too. RSS is a great way to follow the people whose posts, ideas, and opinions matter to you. So if you write or put any kind of content on your site, also make sure to add an RSS feed. And then go and add some sites to a feed reader like Feedbin, Feedly, or Michael Scharnagl’s Feediary. If you use a Mac or iOS device, also have a look at Reeder.

Use website directories.

There are a few really helpful directories that list RSS feeds or personal sites and that can help you find interesting content. For example, Andy Bell’s personalsit.es, Dave Winer’s feedbase, the IndieWeb Directory, or RSS lists like the ones of Sime Vidas or Stuart Robson.

Use Webmentions and Microformats – and join the IndieWeb.

Another powerful technology which can glue our sites together is Webmention. Webmention is a W3C recommendation that describes a simple protocol to notify any URL when a website links to it, and for web pages to request notifications when somebody links to them. The mentioned site can then grab a snippet of the HTML of the website that links to it and, if it is enriched with Microformats, display the mention somewhere, for example under a blog post like this one. Aside from all questions of data protection, Webmentions are a powerful tool and one of the many technologies that originated in the IndieWeb community. If you don’t know about the IndieWeb yet, take a look at my article on reclaiming control over your content, or head over to indieweb.org. Built around the basic idea that you should own your content, the IndieWeb community is the birthplace of a few powerful technologies that all have the goal to make your personal website the center of a more open, decentralized web.

Webmentions are a great way to connect and intertwine two sites and thus, two ideas. You could even build something like a commenting system around Webmention – if only it still wasn’t a bit complicated for mere mortals to implement them. Luckily, there are plugins available for content management systems like Wordpress, ProcessWire, or Perch. I will update my own Webmention plugin for Craft CMS over the coming weeks so that it supports the latest version 3 of Craft CMS.

Go to meetups and conferences and spread the word.

There are meetups for everything and they are a great place to meet like-minded people, exchange, connect, and tell others about how great having a personal website is. So look up if there’s maybe a meetup about blogging in your city. Also, meetups on topics like WordPress, writing, or publishing in general could be worth a visit. Then there are more and more Homebrew Website Clubs emerging. Homebrew Website Clubs, which are also an IndieWeb idea, are a great opportunity to work with others on your personal sites once or twice a month. And if you don’t find an appropriate meetup or event near you, how about starting one?

“Don’t do it like me. Do it like you.”

As you can see, there are many ways and many good reasons to start building your site today. But whatever you start, keep in mind that you don’t have to build something from start to finish to show it to the world. To the contrary, it can be a great idea to start as simple and rudimentary as possible, to get the fundamentals right before diving too deep into over-complicated solutions. Take your time to think about how to build a site that’s truly tailored to you and your work. What are you really trying to achieve? What content do you want to create? Who is your audience? And how does a website look like that reflects all that in terms of structure, hierarchy, complexity, visual design, and scope?

Kylie Timpani, for example, who recently worked as the lead designer on v17 of CSS-Tricks, is now doing an open redesign of her website. So she is building the website out in the open, starting with some blank and raw HTML, and will be documenting what she’s learning along the way. This, by the way, is generally a great thing to do on your site: Document your process and share all the things you learn. Amber Wilson is doing this on her site, too. Since she decided to become a web developer, she regularly writes about her experience and what she learned. Not only is this a great way to help others find their way, but it also shows that we all have to learn and we all have things we don't know. Don’t let that stop you.

Also, don’t hesitate to write about little ideas and observations that might seem too small or unimportant to share. We all have our unique perspectives and even the smallest experience is worth sharing. Someone else might be in a similar situation as you or also in a completely different situation. They both might learn something new from reading about your experiences. Each contribution to the community, even the smallest one, is useful and will make a change. So just write. By the way: If you are struggling to find something to write about and feel blocked, remember that there is no such thing as writer‘s block. The more you write and create, the easier it will get.

To Begin, Begin

When I studied design back in the early 2000s, my digital media professor, Tom Duscher, held the view that every designer should have their own blog. It was still the early days of blogging but he already saw the potential and power of writing about your craft and reflecting on your experiences. At the time, I thought I understood what he meant, but it took me over 10 years to finally overcome (or simply ignore) the fear of being wrong and start to publish on my site. I won’t ever look back.

Building and maintaining your personal website is an investment that is challenging and can feel laborious at times. Be prepared for that. But what you will learn along the way does easily make up for all the effort and makes the journey more than worthwhile. But most importantly, having a website makes you part of an amazing community of creators, forming new friendships, new connections, and new opportunities. This is invaluable.

Personal websites are the backbone of the independent Web of creators. Even after all those years, they remain a vital part of what makes the web the most remarkable and open medium to date. We shouldn’t take this for granted, though. If we don’t pay enough attention and care about the open web enough, we might lose this valuable asset. So let us protect the Web as a source of inspiration, diversity, creativity, and community. Let us maintain what we have and work together to make this little part of the magic of the Web sparkle even brighter. Let us help new members of the community to start their journey. Let us build, prototype, publish, and connect.

Let’s start today.

If you start a new personal site or already have one, you are welcome to share it below. There are three ways to do that: If your site supports that, just send a Webmention via your personal website. You can also use the form below this article to send a Webmention. Then, you can reply to this tweet – all replies are automatically added to this article as a Webmention. Or, write me a quick email and I’m happy to manually add your site below.

The header image illustration is based on photographs of the Apple Lisa by Victor R. Ruiz and the Apple Lisa mouse by Marcin Wichary, both released under a Creative Commons license (Attribution 2.0 Generic, CC BY 2.0).

Prototyping.news: For a monthly update on the latest articles, tools, and other resources about prototyping for the Web, sign up for my free newsletter prototyping.news.

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237 Webmentions

Photo of Tom Tinkerson
Tom Tinkerson
A love letter to your personal publishing space aka your own web site. Great read (once again) by ⁦;@m_ott⁩;
Photo of Max Böck
Max Böck
Join the indieweb today and start publishing on your own site. We can bring back the web we had. #LetsFixThis
Photo of https://jgregorymcverry.com
https://jgregorymcverry.com
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer: matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of midzer
midzer
Think global, write personal
Photo of Max Böck
Max Böck
Join the indieweb today and start publishing on your own site. We can bring back the web we had. #LetsFixThis
Photo of Sebastian Greger
Sebastian Greger

The week in quotes (2019W19)

Vicky Boykis advocates for “a move to leisure as a modus operandi”: The ability to have room for leisure has always also been an upper-class pursuit. Just ask anyone at Downton Abbey. What did people do there all day? Breakfast, chat, read, take walks, and by then it was time for dinner on large, quiet estates. Today, the true signal of privilege and choice means not only the ability to block out physical ...
Photo of Oliver Schöndorfer
Oliver Schöndorfer
“If we would make the conscious decision to find better ways to connect our personal sites and to enable more social interaction again, … we could … influence the development of Web technologies into this direction.” Thanks for this article, @m_ott
Photo of Calum Ryan
Calum Ryan
"Whenever you stumble upon an interesting thought on another site, write about it and link to it." | An in-depth article about protecting the open web and having a personal website – Into the Personal-Website-Verse by @m_ott » (https://matthiasott.com/articles/into-the-personal-website-verse)
Photo of Calum Ryan | calumryan.com
Calum Ryan | calumryan.com
"Whenever you stumble upon an interesting thought on another site, write about it and link to it." | An in-depth article about protecting the open web and having a personal website – Into the Personal-Website-Verse by @m_ott » (matthiasott.com/articles/into-…) (calumryan.com/note/2677)
Photo of Manuel Matuzović;
Manuel Matuzović;
Oh, wow! You should read this fantastic article by @m_ott. "Personal websites are the backbone of the independent Web of creators. Even after all those years, they remain a vital part of what makes the web the most remarkable and open medium to date."
Photo of Sara Soueidan
Sara Soueidan
This article by ⁦;@m_ott⁩; about the state of the Web & the importance of personal Web sites should become a must read. I wanted to quote every paragraph in it. His passion for a truly Indie Web is evident
Photo of Philip Brewer
Philip Brewer
Why did this stop being automatic! "So if you write or put any kind of content on your site, also make sure to add an RSS feed." matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Israel Muñoz
Israel Muñoz
"Especialmente, pero no solo, si trabajas como independiente o freelancer, tu contenido no es solamente algo que hayas creado, sino que es parte de tu identidad. Es parte de lo que eres, lo que estás pensando, lo que crees, y lo que estás haciendo": @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of HWC Brussels
HWC Brussels
Into the Personal-Website-Verse #Indieweb : matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Ricardo Mendes
Ricardo Mendes
Into the Personal-Website-Verse #Indieweb : matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Adactio Links
Adactio Links
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Lobsters
Lobsters
Into the Personal-Website-Verse via @danburzo lobste.rs/s/ocyjzv #philosophy matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of tokutakes
tokutakes
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Israel
Israel
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Kevin Stewart
Kevin Stewart
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-… via @instapaper
Photo of Jacky Alciné
Jacky Alciné
Lots of nuggets of gold and strong cases for the IndieWeb in this post from Matthias Ott: https://matthiasott.com/articles/into-the-personal-website-verse.
Photo of jackyalciné (he/him/his)
jackyalciné (he/him/his)
Lots of nuggets of gold and strong cases for the IndieWeb in this post from Matthias Ott: matthiasott.com/articles/into-…. (v2.jacky.wtf/post/433031d8-…)
Photo of Priyesh Patel
Priyesh Patel
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of dirk döring
dirk döring
This is a must read. And it even more fires my motivation to finish my website i started last weekend @indiewebcamp #quitslacking
Photo of lobste.rs bot
lobste.rs bot
Into the Personal-Website-Verse matthiasott.com/articles/into-… lobste.rs/s/ocyjzv/into_… #philosophy
Photo of Ana Rodrigues
Ana Rodrigues
Another amazing article about personal web sites that came out this weekend. ✨; "But most importantly, having a website makes you part of an amazing community of creators, forming new friendships, new connections, and new opportunities. This is invaluable."
Photo of Chris McLeod
Chris McLeod
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer
Photo of neehad
neehad
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Superluchito
Superluchito
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of tams sokari
tams sokari
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Quentin Bellanger
Quentin Bellanger
Best reading of the week! I wish people rely less on social media platforms and more on personal websites. In my experience, my personal website taught me so much. It's basically my dev playground where I can write and experiment new things.
Photo of Hans Gerwitz
Hans Gerwitz
Social media sucks, but that doesn't mean the web has to.
Photo of Gift Egwuenu ✨;
Gift Egwuenu ✨;
⭐;️; Recommended read: Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Katherine Moss
Katherine Moss
Just getting started on cambridgeport90.net. Basically a blog, and anything else I find interesting.
smallbellows

Hello world?

In a moment of inspiration combined perfectly with procrastination, I have decided to start a personal web page. This will be a place for me to explore and experiment, to try stuff out, and to talk “out loud” about those experiences. I was heartily inspired by Matthias Ott’s post on the perks personal website. So far, all I’ve done is install WordPress. Something I’ve done many, many times. But ...
Photo of Ann
Ann
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of HJ Chen @ YGLF Vilnius
HJ Chen @ YGLF Vilnius
“Don’t do it like me. Do it like you.”–@m_ott on building your personal website ❤;️; #web
Photo of Mike Taylor
Mike Taylor
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · A personal website is also a powerful playground to tinker with new technologies and discover your powers. @m_ott buff.ly/30ioWae
Photo of Malte Müller
Malte Müller
„Into the Personal-Website-Verse“ matthiasott.com/articles/into-… https://t.co/DiLSXsKP0O
Photo of ZenphotoCMS
ZenphotoCMS
„Into the Personal-Website-Verse“ matthiasott.com/articles/into-… https://t.co/SJQImzOlWe
Photo of Sanne Peters
Sanne Peters
A good argumentation for owning and maintaining your own content and not using social media for it: matthiasott.com/articles/into-… Yes, I am aware of my own hypocrisy ????;
Photo of Г;о;н;з;о;
Г;о;н;з;о;
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of jérôme coupé
jérôme coupé
The « retour en grâce » of the personal website. Let’s weave our little corners of the web together /via @thylo matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Darathtey Din
Darathtey Din
Interesting read | Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Pinboard Popular
Pinboard Popular
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Val Head
Val Head
Reading this made me feel equal parts guilty and inspired. Time to get that personal site up and running again! @m_ott makes a very good case for why personal web sites and the indie web are so important both for you and the community: matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Pinboard Popular
Pinboard Popular
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of theAdhocracy
theAdhocracy
Fantastic article an the alternative to giant corporations, tech monopolies, and bot-infested race-to-the-bottom social media: the humble, personal website. ????; Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of nuncapops
nuncapops
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Matt Robin
Matt Robin
Personal Websites: It's not nostalgia, but this also reminds me of previous remarks by @zeldman (unless I'm mistaken, please, correct me if I'm wrong Jeffey!) matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Stefan Judis
Stefan Judis
Excellent article by @m_ott about why owning your data is important and the role your personal website plays in this. ????;????;????; matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of chles
chles
✍;️; par @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Chris Heilmann
Chris Heilmann
"Into the Personal-Website-Verse" matthiasott.com/articles/into-… @m_ott with an empowering, detailed post how to make your personal mark on the web by owning your content.
Photo of Chris Heilmann
Chris Heilmann
One very personal dislike I have is articles where the scrollbar doesn't indicate the length. (Yes, this is probably an "old person of the web" thing). Take matthiasott.com/articles/into-… on a desktop computer. The scrollbar indicates it is HUUUUUUUGGEE and I didn't read it until ...
Photo of Dave Rupert
Dave Rupert
? hooray, blogs! matthiasott.com/articles/into-… Great post by @m_ott
Photo of Aditee Singhi
Aditee Singhi
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-… #initiatives
Photo of Webrocker
Webrocker

Take back your web - Tantek Çelik @ Beyond Tellerrand Conference, Düsseldorf 2019

Watch this. Understand this. For quite a while now I really think we are at a crucial point in the history of the web. In the weeks before this year's event, I thought back at my first visits to the Beyond Tellerrand Conference, how much it impressed me and where I was exposed to a real paradigm shift right at the start of the "responsive" thing. In the following years, the talks and general trends got ...
Bill Bennett
Matthias Ott just reminded me to check the microformat stuff was working on my billbennett.co.nz site (it wasn’t). These things are important. matthiasott.com/articles/…
Photo of Bill Bennett
Bill Bennett
Also, I like the idea of bringing back webrings. Researching that will keep me out of mischief this weekend. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Bill Bennett
Bill Bennett
Matthias Ott just reminded me to check the microformat stuff was working on my billbennett.co.nz site (it wasn’t). These things are important. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Rob King
Rob King
I once tried to start a webring with only people called Rob King. It was the "King Ring". It didn't really take off.
Photo of Ignacio Villanueva
Ignacio Villanueva
Siempre he dicho que me gusta ser "dueño" en la medida de lo posible del contenido que creo (salvo Twitter, claro). ¿Sabéis lo que son los Web Silos? Medium es un ejemplo claro, Facebook, Twitter... ????; Into the Personal-Website-Verse matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Eugene Martell

Hello world!

Inspired by this great post by Matthias Ott, I’m rebooting my personal website. For too long I’ve been worried about whether I had anything good to write or unique to contribute (and, honestly, what this site would look like), but as Matthias says: [D]on’t hesitate to write about little ideas and observations that might seem too small or unimportant to share. We all have our unique perspectives and even ...
Photo of Graphite
Graphite
A great reminder from @m_ott that there is plenty we can do as individuals to reclaim the decentralization that was once the web matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Geffrey van der Bos
Geffrey van der Bos

In reply to: Into the Personal-Website-Verse

Move away from the censored social media silos. Start a social, personal website. You own all the content, all under your own domain name. How great does that even sound! Thank you, Matthias, for the inspiration of making my website just a tat more social. And of course for our short brainstorm on Twitter!
Photo of Brendan Dawes
Brendan Dawes
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Amber Wilson
Amber Wilson
For the love of personal websites ♥️; thanks for the awesome, important post and mention @m_ott. I'm soon going to document each part of my in-progress site re-make and release lots more posts! :-) #PersonalWebsites
Photo of Paul McFedries
Paul McFedries
“There is one alternative to social media sites and publishing platforms that has been around since the early, innocent days of the web. It is an alternative that provides immense freedom and control: The personal website.” —@m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Karthik
Karthik
Two fantastic perspectives on the need to own your digital narrative, in a place that you can call your own. One, from @m_ott, a User Experience Designer: Into the Personal-Website-Verse bit.ly/2wlWyWZ His #longread on personal websites goes back to the 1/5
Photo of Mark Dittmer
Mark Dittmer
Here’s my first shot at a quill-post for unused-for-almost-a-decade blog. Thanks @m_ott for the inspiration via matthiasott.com/articles/into-… (blog.markdittmer.org/?p=118)
Photo of Ecologia Digital
Ecologia Digital
"Personal websites are the backbone of the #indieWeb of creators. If we don’t pay enough attention and care about the #openweb, we might lose this valuable asset. So let us protect the Web as a source of inspiration, diversity, creativity, and community." matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Ralf G.
Ralf G.
Auf den Indieweb-Zug springen…
Photo of Paul
Paul
I really enjoyed reading Matthias Ott’s post titled Into the Personal-Website-Verse. It’s an essay about why it’s so important to have your own space on the Web, and why IndieWeb is a great way to get there. It’s well worth the read. There are many reasons to have your own site, at your own domain, that you control. Aside from retaining effective control over your content, the risk of entrusting our ...
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Paul
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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mekalav
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Benjamin De Kosnik
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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AKA
Something I've been thinking about for quite a while: why personal websites and blogs are so much better than social media in 2019: matthiasott.com/articles/into-… (h/t @dan_hill)
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Kenjie S. Suarez
The Impending Death of Facebook. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Jacob Sam-La Rose
And in the moments between things, I'm thinking about how to make best use of the web (again)... From matthiasott.com/articles/into-…:
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Brendan Schlagel
Enjoyed this article about personal websites: as personal exploratory space; as playground for creative learning and tinkering; as community web… Making me want to implement webrings & webmentions on my own site(s)!
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Irregular Batch of Interesting Links #8

It seems that my irregular batches are becoming weekly. This week there are links to articles about how tech affects people and about humans. Looking around at social media and web in general, it is more than ever important to keep personal websites alive. Matthias Ott wrote good introduction to them. Through one of the recommended blogs in my RSS feed I came across Luis Coelho illustrations of animals. Online ...
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Kyle Libra
This is great. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Brett @ IAMTHELAB
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Jérôme Gamez
This is good: „Into the Personal-Website-Verse“ by @m_ott (via @DenseDiscovery) matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Kevin Kirkpatrick
A love letter to personal websites. ????;????; Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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SitePoint
The personal website is making a comeback. @m_ott has some thoughts, and practical advice for those looking to get involved. buff.ly/2X4pePv
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????; Mike Tannenbaum ????;
Love it this ode to the personal website. “Personal websites are the backbone of the independent Web of creators. They remain a vital part of what makes the web the most remarkable and open medium to date.” Well said, @m_ott! matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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msgWP
We couldn't agree more, @m_ott. "There is one alternative to social media sites and publishing platforms that has been around since the early, innocent days of the web. It is an alternative that provides immense freedom and control: The personal website." matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Stéphanie Walter
I was quite depressed about my personal site the last couple of weeks because I got quite some exhausting and annoying comments about it. But this article is exactly what I needed to read: "Personal-Website-Verse" matthiasott.com/articles/into-… 1/
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matt finlayson
well, here is a manifesto for the indieweb matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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fluffy

Keeping it personal

I just read this great essay by Matthias Ott. It does a great job of summarizing the state of affairs of blogging and social media, and how we can try to escape the current orbit to get back to where the web was meant to be.
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T❘;LM△;N
Inspiring article by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-… tldr;: Let’s ditch all those flawed commercial social networks and built a new one, with personal linked websites, like in the old days! ????; Is this the future? Sounds good.
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Hyperalp
Der beste Artikel seit langem für alle, die etwas im Netz publizieren. Leseempfehlung. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Roel Groeneveld
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Tekla Szymanski
Your content is one of your most valuable assets and thus owning it is key. It gets drowned out on social media and you'll loose copyrights on some publishing platforms. Go back to a personal website, share, link and interact on your terms. via @m_ott ow.ly/Fc9s30p1kER
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Chuck Munson
Going Indie. Step 2: Reclaiming Content matthiasott.com/articles/into-… #IndieWeb #OpenWeb
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Chris Aldrich

Social Reading User Interface for Discovery

I read quite a bit of material online. I save “bookmarks” of all of it on my personal website, sometimes with some additional notes and sometimes even with more explicit annotations. One of the things I feel like I’m missing from my browser, browser extensions, and/or social feed reader is a social layer overlay that could indicate that people in my social network(s) have read or interacted directly with ...
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bodemotion
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer wunderbarer Text über die hoffentlich baldige Rückkehr der eigenen Homepage. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Ahmed Al Omran
Now imagine, for a moment, an environment where a decentralized fabric of connected personal sites allows everyone to publish their own content but also enables each individual to engage in an open discussion matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Jon
Into the Personal-Website-Verse (via @Pocket) #longreads matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
Photo of Mischa ????; ????;
Mischa ????; ????;
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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New Local Media
Into the Personal-Website-Verse ... and out of the platform garbage fire ????;????;????;by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Eco Web Hosting
"There is one alternative to social media sites and publishing platforms that has been around since the early, innocent days of the web. It is an alternative that provides immense freedom and control: The personal website." - @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Divi Den
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Stefan Grund

Into the Personal-Website-Verse

If we would make the conscious decision to find better ways to connect our personal sites and to enable more social interaction again, and if we would then persistently work on this idea, then we could, bit by bit, influence the development of Web technologies into this direction. What we would end up with is not only a bunch of personal websites but a whole interconnected personal-website-verse. Matthias hält ...
Photo of fluffy
fluffy

Keeping it personal

I just read this great essay by Matthias Ott. It does a great job of summarizing the state of affairs of blogging and social media, and how we can try to escape the current orbit to get back to where the web was meant to be.
Photo of fluffy
fluffy

Keeping it personal

I just read this great essay by Matthias Ott. It does a great job of summarizing the state of affairs of blogging and social media, and how we can try to escape the current orbit to get back to where the web was meant to be.
Photo of Mαtt Thomαs
Mαtt Thomαs
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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brook shelley
I think I already posted this in my newsletter, but it's a very good article on how and why to do your own web stuff matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Ana Mora
The irony of sharing this great piece on Twitter. Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott thanks to @petitebrunette matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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isil
Si, como yo, estáis un poco rallades con la forma malévola y robatiempos en la que se ha encasquillado internet, esto os interesará: matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Ste Grainer
Finally got around to reading “Into the Personal-Website-Verse” by @m_ott : matthiasott.com/articles/into-… I wish everyone I knew had a personal website whether they work on the web or not. That would be way more enjoyable than following them on social media …
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Nathan W. Bingham
Long live the personal website. This Saturday read brought back good memories of blogrolls and webrings. Perhaps there is a future beyond algorithms and social media. Thanks to @ChrisBowler for the recommended read. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Philip Brewer
Here’s a great summary of all the things I never quit using: a personal website, #RSS, blogroll, etc. Now augmented with indieweb stuff like webmention, micro.blog, etc. matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Wünderbucket
This is the reason I'm building Wünderbucket: matthiasott.com/articles/into-… Thanks for the excellent article, @m_ott
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Hanane ❅;
This post and "Out there" are two of the articles that gave me the motivation to start my own website and blog! Thank you for writing them ????; Matthias Ott Matthias Ott Zoe Chew ????;????;????;‍????;????;
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Matthias Ott
Hey Hanane, that’s so great! ????;????; I’m really glad to hear that I could help you a bit with my posts. Good luck with your site! Hanane ❅; Zoe Chew ????;????;????;‍????;????;
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Hanane ❅;
Thank you very much, Matthias! Matthias Ott Matthias Ott Zoe Chew ????;????;????;‍????;????;
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Thomasorus
« Your content [...] is also part of your identity. It is part of who you are, what you’re thinking about, what you believe in, and what you’re up to. It is part of the story you are about to tell. It is part of the change you seek to make. » matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Wim Symons
Into the Personal-Website-Verse, by @m_ott matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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HïMY SYeD
"One day, Twitter & other publishing platforms like Facebook, Instagram, or Medium will indeed die, like so many sites before them. Every time this happens, we lose most of the content we created & with it a fair amount of our collective cultural history" matthiasott.com/articles/into-…
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Marie Guillaumet
Lettre d’amour aux sites perso, aux webrings et autres blogrolls (en anglais) : matthiasott.com/articles/into-… ????;????; Le tissage de nos propres réseaux indé sur le web a une valeur particulière, vs. les plateformes type Twitter ou Medium qui disparaîtront un jour. (Via @WalterStephanie.)
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GBO
Into the Personal-Website-Verse · Matthias Ott – User Experience Designer matthiasott.com/articles/into-… @m_ott
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Jason Garber
Into the Personal-Website-Verse – matthiasott.com/articles/into-…

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